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Research Incubator Awards Announced

June 19, 2009

The Duke Institute for Brain Sciences is pleased to announce the Research Incubator Awards for 2009-2010!

The Duke Institute for Brain Sciences Research Incubator Awards are annual awards designed to promote collaborations between existing Duke faculty from different disciplines by pooling their talents to pioneer high risk/high gain interdisciplinary research relevant to the DIBS Research Themes. The projects must engage at least two faculty representing multiple fields or levels of analysis and bring together investigators whose individual programs of research are not already connected from across the University. Proposed projects that include investigators from multiple schools within the University (e.g., School of Medicine, Arts and Sciences, Pratt School of Engineering, etc.) are encouraged.

By establishing support for interdisciplinary research teams DIBS hopes to encourage innovative approaches to problems that transcend the boundaries of traditional disciplines, integrating the brain sciences with biomedical and life sciences, social sciences, physical sciences, humanities, law, business, public policy, mathematics, computer sciences, and engineering. Successful proposals focus the talents of an interdisciplinary working group on fundamental questions of brain function that advance basic science, translational science, health science, policy, or combinations thereof. This support is intended to provide a basis for project development and pilot research ultimately leading to external funding for the ongoing collaborative work.

New Awards:

Feasibility Studies of the Inferior Colliculus as a Prosthetic Site

Nell Cant (Neurobiology); Warren Grill (Biomedical Engineering); Jennifer Groh (Psychology & Neuroscience, Neurobiology, and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); Debara Tucci (Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery and the Duke Hearing Center); Blake Wilson (Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery and the Duke Hearing Center).

Interoception and the Development of Self-Regulation in Adolescence

Adrian Angold (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and the Center for Developmental Epidemiology); Philip Costanzo (Psychology & Neuroscience); Helen Egger (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and the Center for Developmental Epidemiology); Richard Keefe (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences); Cynthia Kuhn (Pharmacology & Cancer Biology); Kevin LaBar (Psychology & Neuroscience, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Center for Neuroeconomic Studies, and the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center); Rhonda Merwin (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences); Steven Stanton (Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); James T. Voyvodic (Radiology and the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center); Martin H. Ulshen (Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition); Chongming Yang (Social Sciences Research Institute); Nancy Zucker (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and the Duke Eating Disorders Program).

Noninvasive Chemical Genetic Control of Neuronal Activity

Marc Caron (Cell Biology); Michael Ehlers (Neurobiology); Richard Mooney (Neurobiology); William Wetsel (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences); Bruce Bean (Harvard Medical School, Neurobiology); Richard Palmiter (University of Washington, Biochemistry).

Using a Novel Approach for Functional Brain Imaging In Mouse Models of Psychiatric Disorders

Guoping Feng (Neurobiology); Yong-hui Jiang (Pediatrics, Division of Medical Genetics); Chistopher Lascola (Radiology and the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center); Allen Song (Biomedical Engineering and the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center).

Continuations:

Decisions under Risk: From Phenotype to Mechanism

R. Alison Adcock (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences); James Bettman (Marketing, Fuqua School of Business); Elizabeth Brannon (Psychology & Neuroscience and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); David Goldstein (Molecular Genetics & Microbiology and the Institute for Genome Science and Policy); Scott Huettel (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Brain Imaging and Analysis Center and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); Kevin LaBar (Psychology & Neuroscience and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); Mary Frances Luce (Marketing, Fuqua School of Business); John Payne (Management, Fuqua School of Business); Michael Platt (Neurobiology and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience); Pate Skene (Neurobiology); and Nancy Zucker (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences).

Dissecting Synaptic and Circuitry Mechanisms of Bipolar Disorder

Allison Ashley-Koch (Medicine and the Center for Human Genetics); Nicole Calakos (Neurology); Guoping Feng (Neurobiology); and William Wetsel (Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences).

Engineering Optogenetic Sensors and Actuators for Imaging and Controlling Brain Activity

George J. Augustine (Neurobiology); Lorena Beese (Biochemistry); and Homme Hellinga (Biochemistry).

Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes and MEMS Microrobots for Intracellular Neuronal Recordings

Bruce Donald (Computer Science and Biochemistry); Gleb Finkelstein (Physics); and Richard Mooney (Neurobiology).

Non-invasive Optical Measurements of Spatially Resolved Electrical Activity in the Retina

Vadim Arshavsky (Ophthalmology); and Joseph Izatt (Biomedical Engineering).

About DIBS

The Duke Institute for Brain Sciences (DIBS) was created in 2007 as a cross-school, campus-wide, interdisciplinary Institute with a commitment to building an interactive community of brain science research and scholarship.